Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control – Investigation of Key Human Factors Issues

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Project Name:
Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control – Investigation of Key Human Factors Issues
FHWA.JPG
General information
Category:Project
Category:US FHWA
From October 2013 to December 2014 Funded
Contact
N/A
Brian Philips, Ph.D. (Federal Highway Administration)
brian.philips@dot.gov
FHWA Exploratory Advanced Research Program, Office of Safety R&D, Office of Operations R&D, Leidos, AAI

Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) technologies (cruise control systems that communicate between vehicles to maintain an automated safe distance during highway travel) have the potential to reduce highway congestion. While already technically feasible, concerns over human abilities and limitations in using such systems are potentially significant hurdles to implementation. This study investigates two human factor areas for CACC systems:

  • Workload, situational awareness, and distraction for drivers
  • Entry and exit into a platoon of CACC-equipped vehicles

Keypoints

  • Validated driving simulator test methodology and tools
  • Validated driving simulator test methodology and tools, and increased understanding of human behavior using CACC technology.

Outcomes

  • Investigation of two central human factors issues inherent in CACC that will bring CACC systems closer to implementation.
  • Increased understanding of human factors related issues.
  • Data to improve micro simulation of large scale CACC implementation.

Related Projects

  • Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control: Human Factors Analysis
  • Partial Automation for Truck Platooning: Auburn University”

Partners

FHWA Exploratory Advanced Research Program, Office of Safety R&D, Office of Operations R&D, Leidos, AAI

Budget / Funding

N/A / 1621103

Keywords

Safety Assurance, CACC, Human Factors